Cathey Sadowski: Doing What We Can

by Jessica Edington

Cathey Sadowski is a board member with FISH, Inc, a local organization that provides food, clothing, and transportation to community members in need. She took some time to speak with the Office of Community Engagement about her work with FISH, the community, and William & Mary volunteers.

Office of Community Engagement: Tell us about your role in the community.

Cathey: FISH has helped persons in need in the Williamsburg area with food, clothing and transportation to medical appointments since 1975. It is the oldest of such organizations in the area and is supported entirely by contributions from the community, both financial and in-kind. FISH was founded on the philosophy of “neighbor helping neighbor” so we have no paid staff, take no tax money, nor do we seek grants from outside the Williamsburg community.

During 2013, FISH provided food equivalent to 158,220 meals; 10,287 outfits of clothing; and housewares to 568 homes. Overall, our volunteers served 5,051 requests for assistance, an increase of 6% over requests in 2012 (when requests were 14% higher than in 2011). Unfortunately, 2014 service numbers indicate that FISH is needed more than ever this year.

OCE: What role do William & Mary students play at FISH? What benefits does your organization derive from working with William & Mary students?

Cathey: William & Mary students are generous donors of both food and clothing to FISH. Many campus organizations and athletic teams sponsor food and clothing drives, significantly enhancing the services FISH can provide clients. Student support of the annual W&M Costume Sale before Halloween is important to the FISH budget. Direct volunteering at FISH is not feasible for most students, but there have been occasions when W&M students have given of their time in the FISH facility; the regular volunteers, most of whom are retired, always enjoy the young presence.

OCE: How do you see the students benefiting from their work?

Cathey: Through their efforts to help community members in need, students can gain awareness of the difficulties faced by many individuals and families, including some who work for the College in lower-paid positions.

OCE: How do you see the community benefiting from your work and the work of William & Mary students?

Cathey: There is less hunger in Williamsburg and more persons have useful clothing because students help FISH. The community may not know that students are important contributors to this effort, but FISH is pleased to pass the word whenever possible.

OCE: How are does your organization help educate student volunteers about community needs?

Cathey: FISH is happy to work with the Office of Community Engagement to help W&M students understand the way FISH serves the community – and the ways in which that support is limited to short-term assistance.

OCE: What does active citizenship mean to you?

Cathey: Active citizenship means giving time, talent and monetary support to helping members of the community, as well as the world, with basic human needs.  Food, clothing and transportation, are only a few of those basic needs; we are not able to solve systemic injustices; and, we can only help the persons of our local community. But in this case, active citizenship means doing what we can with what we have to share.