Sahnun Mohammud: Giving a Voice to the Situation in Somalia

OCE Community Profile Series
By Daniela Sainz ’15 | October 2013

Sahnun Muhamed for blog

Sahnun Mohammud is a Junior at the college who has been heavily influenced by the civil war that has been occurring in his native Somalia for over 20 years. Partially inspired by his mother, who runs a Non-Government Organization in Somalia, Sahnun decided to lead an initiative on campus to raise student awareness about the humanitarian crisis in Somalia. Students for Somalia is an organization that raises awareness about the humanitarian crises and raises funds for development projects in Somalia. Here we explore how Sahnun helped create the student organization and some of the challenged that he has had to overcome to bring it into fruition.

Office of Community Engagement: How are you involved in community engagement at William & Mary?

Sahnun Mohammud: I give a voice to the situation in Somalia – I educate the campus community on the humanitarian struggle that has been happening for the past two decades in Somalia. We campaign for topics to be addressed and for guest speakers to come to our campus. We work on several projects, primarily projects that focus on development in Somalia. We raised over $6,000 in collaboration with Purdue University for an Internally Displaced People Camp to be built. It’s currently in the process of being approved for construction, but the process will begin in the next few months.

OCE: What does active citizenship mean for you?

SM: Active citizenship means someone who recognizes that they are a part of a society, and they strive to better that society outside of themselves.

OCE: How has your experience working in the community affected your educational career at William & Mary?

SM: It has made me develop fantastic leadership and social/interpersonal skills. They are very different skills from the ones that you learn within a classroom setting. It definitely made me more well-rounded.

OCE: How do you plan to use what you’ve learned as an engaged citizen beyond William & Mary?

SM: I plan to start a business. I have the leadership, organizational, and interpersonal skills from my experiences with Students for Somalia. I plan to be in a similar situation when trying to organize people in the future. I would like to think I will be well prepared to organize people and organize them well.

OCE: What is the most memorable or striking moment you experienced during your engagement work?

SM: The first meeting we ever held for Students for Somalia consisted of a small group of people that had a vision, but not sure how to implement it. After the meeting was over, we had created a place to meet, and we had a trajectory in mind. We got down to it. We weren’t sure about a lot of things but the whole organization had been conceptualized.